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Remarks from Zoe Gross at Disability Day of Mourning 2019

A study came out back in December that got some press this week. The headlines were something like “Autistic children are more likely to be abused.” This isn’t new information – if you work in the field of disability, you should know that disabled people are disproportionately likely to...

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Find your local Day of Mourning vigil site

In the past five years, over 650 people with disabilities have been murdered by their parents, relatives or caregivers. On Friday, March 1st, the disability community will gather across the nation to remember these disabled victims of filicide – disabled people murdered by their family members or caregivers. In...

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Remarks from Julia Bascom at the DC DDOM Vigil

Thank you all for coming here today and bearing witness with us to all of the lives taken from us before their time. A theme we heard strongly at last year’s vigils, and that we have continued to hear since, is that these murders and atrocities are a reflection...

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Find your local Day of Mourning vigil site

In the past five years, over 550 people with disabilities have been murdered by their parents, relatives or caregivers. On Thursday, March 1st, the disability community will gather across the nation to remember these disabled victims of filicide – disabled people murdered by their family members or caregivers. In...

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On Our Backs, We Will Carry Them

Reflections on the 2015 Disability Day of Mourning From ASAN President Ari Ne’eman Memory is an important part of how we define our communities. When we think about the history of the disability rights movement, there are so many moments at which we stop and think to ourselves, “But...

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Understandable

by Meg Evans The characters and events in this short story are entirely fictional. Sometimes drawing a picture makes things more understandable. When Kelsey was younger she’d carried big spiral notebooks everywhere with her, sketching obsessively. Then her therapist, Dr. Caldwell, had told her that now she was in...

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